Japanese beetle, Popillia japonica Newman (Scarabaeidae)

By Mollie Thorsen

Japanese beetle, Popillia japonica Newman. © 2012, A.V. Evans

The Japanese beetle, Popillia japonica Newman (10-15 mm) is distinctively coppery-green with shiny dark brown wing covers (elytra) and five white tufts down each side of the abdomen. Adults feed on the leaves, flowers, and fruits of more than 300 species of plants. The larvae, called white grubs are major turf pests of lawns, parks, and golf courses that cost $450 million dollars annually to control. One generation is produced annually. This invasive species is widespread in Virginia and found throughout much of eastern North America.

References

Evans, A.V., 2007. National Wildlife Federation Field Guide to Insects & Spiders of North America. Sterling Publishing Co., New York, NY.

Japanese beetle. http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/orn/beetles/japanese_beetle.htm (accessed 27 June 2012)

Species Popillia japonica, Japanese beetle. http://bugguide.net/node/view/473 (accessed 28 June 2012)

 

Reticulated net-winged beetle, Calopteron reticulatum (Fabricius) (Lycidae)

By Ashly Robertson

Reticulated net-winged beetle, Calopteron reticulatum (Fabricius). © 2012, A.V. Evans

The reticulated net-winged beetle, Calopteron reticulatum (Fabricius) (9-18 mm) are  soft-bodied, distinctly orange and black, and are widest near the tips of their wing covers (elytra). The underside of the thorax is black with a distinct reddish-brown patch. Adults are found resting on vegetation, flying, or on flowers feeding on nectar in fields and forests during the summer. The larvae eat fungi and may also prey on small invertebrates. This species is widespread in Virginia and they are found in eastern North America to Mexico. Also known as the banded net-winged beetle.

Evans, A.V., 2007. National Wildlife Federation Field Guide to Insects & Spiders of North America. Sterling Publishing Co., New York, NY.

Banded net-winged beetle, Calopteron reticulatumhttp://bugguide.net/node/view/8195 (accessed 9 July 2012)

Eyed click beetle, Alaus oculatus (Linnaeus) (Elateridae)

By Hunter Weaver

Eyed click beetle, Alaus oculatus (Linnaeus). © 2012, A.V. Evans.

The eyed click beetle, Alaus oculatus (Linneaus) (24-44 mm) has two large eye-spots on the pronotum. Adults on their backs make a “clicking” noise as they flip-up into the air to right themselves or get out of harm’s way. They are active on summer days in forests and prey upon wood-boring beetle larvae in decomposing trees. The predaceous larvae are found in decaying stumps and logs where they prey on beetle larvae. This species is found throughout Virginia and is widespread in eastern North America.

References

Evans, A.V., 2007. National Wildlife Federation Field Guide to Insects & Spiders of North America. Sterling Publishing Co., New York, NY.

Wells, Sam. The Sam Wells Bug Page. The Eyed Click Beetles of the United States and Canada (Coleoptera: Elateridae).(accessed 21 June 2012).

Tile-horned prionus, Prionus imbricornis Drury (Cerambycidae)

By Justin Bates

Tile-horned prionus, Prionus imbricornis Drury. http://eol.org/. Patrick Coin.

The tile-horned prionus, Prionus imbricornis Drury (22-50 mm) has a dark brown and shiny body. There are 18 to 20 overlapping segments found in the antennae in males with 16 to 18 serrated segments in females. The elytra is coarsely pitted. Females lay eggs at the base of deciduous trees and shrubs. The larvae bore into the roots of the trees and can cause extensive damage; their feeding activities lead to the hollowing out of larger roots. The larva takes 3-5  years to adulthood. The nocturnal adults are attracted to light and hide under loose bark during the day. This species is widespread in Virginia and is found in the central and eastern United States, as well as southern Canada.

References

Bug Guide. http://bugguide.net/node/view/3143 (accessed June 20, 2012).

Evans, A.V., 2007. National Wildlife Federation Field Guide to Insects & Spiders of North America. Sterling Publishing Co., New York, NY.

Parasitic Flat-bark Beetle, Catogenus rufus (Fabricius) (Passandridae)

Parasitic flat bark beetle, Catogenus rufus (Fabricius). © 2012, A.V. Evans

By Justin Bates

The parasitic flat-bark beetle, Catogenus rufus (Fabricius) (5.0-11.0 mm) is a small, flat and uniformly dark reddish-brown beetle that is usually found beneath bark of dead or dying hardwoods and conifers. The mouthparts are directed forward, while the eyes are barely visible from above. The antennal segments are beadlike. Females lay eggs in the bark of trees and the larvae are ectoparasites on the pupae of wood-boring beetles. This species is widespread in Virginia and found throughout eastern North America.

Reference

Bug Guide. http://bugguide.net/node/view/36127 (accessed June 26, 2012).

American Carrion Beetle, Necrophila americana (Linnaeus) (Silphidae)

American carrion beetle, Necrophila americana (Linnaeus). © 2012, A.V. Evans.

By Lindsey Tarkington

The American Carrion Beetle, Necrophila americana (Linnaeus). The adults are 13-20 mm in length, have crinkled wing covers (elytra), and resemble bumblebees in flight. They are most commonly found on decaying animal or plant matter in the spring and summertime in open woods and meadows.  Females lay their eggs underneath carcasses to ensure that their larvae will have a food source when they hatch. Like the adults, the black larvae eat decaying animal or plant matter, and take about 3 months to reach adulthood; one generation is produced annually. This species is common throughout Virginia and ranges from Nova Scotia to Florida, west to Manitoba and Texas.

References

Evans, A.V., 2007. National Wildlife Federation Field Guide to Insects & Spiders of North America. Sterling Publishing Co., New York, NY.

White, R.E., 1983. Peterson Field Guides: A Field Guide to the Beetles of North America. Houghton Mifflin Co., New York, NY.

Splendid tiger beetle, Cicindela splendida Hentz (Carabidae)

Splendid tiger beetle, Cicindela splendida Hentz. © 2011, A.V. Evans.

By Arthur V. Evans

The splendid tiger beetle, Cicindela splendida Hentz (12.0-15.0 mm) has a bright, shiny, green or blue body contrasting with coppery to brick-red elytra. Its pronotum is about one-third wider than long with wrinkles across surface. The elytra each with one or two spots or crescent-shaped spot on outer base, a short middle band, an apical bar, and sometimes a dot just before apex. The larva prefers to burrow in patchy, open, red clay soils along road cuts, banks, roads, and sparsely vegetated habitats. They take about 2-3 years to reach maturity. The diurnal adults are found along park trails and other open patches of soil in spring, then again in late summer and early fall. This species is widespread in Virginia and occurs from Pennsylvania to South Carolina, west to South Dakota and New Mexico.

References

Knisley, C.B., and T.D. Schultz. 1997. The Biology of Tiger Beetles and a Guide to the Species of the South Atlantic States. Special Publications Number 5. Virginia Museum of Natural History: Martinsville, VA. 210 pp.